How to Save HOURS on Instagram

We all know that Social Media platforms are a great way to get your business’ message out into the world. I mean, if you really think about it, it’s a f-ing amazing way to get your message out because you’re in complete control of the conversation. Your message won’t get misstated, deleted, or watered down.

If you’re like us, there’s never enough time in the day to post—not to mention the rabbit hole of clicking and liking that can eat away at your valuable time. Sometimes you have the perfect picture, but writer’s block takes over the instant you have time to post. Ugh, the struggle is real.

But … it doesn’t have to be. Today we’re going super-practical and talking about some tools we’ve been using to batch our posts thus saving HOURS on Instagram and Facebook.

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We talk about creating systems in your business ALL THE TIME, and Social is no different.  Having a system to post saves tons of time and eliminates what can often feel like the Social Time Suck.  Want more information on the apps that we’re using to make our posting easier and effective …

MeetEdgar: We use MeetEdgar to post to the studios’ Facebook pages and you can also post to Twitter and LinkedIn.  We love MeetEdgar because it allows us to create a library of content that is categorized based on type of post … and let’s us post when our audience is most active on our Social platforms.

PLANN: If you thought there was no way to schedule your posts for Instagram, you’re wrong!  Thank goodness!  PLANN allows you to create posts in advance and schedule reminders to post on BOTH your Feed and Stories.  You can make sure your Feed pictures have a pleasing arrangement.  And my favorite thing about this app is if you’re posting to  Stories, the pictures don’t have to be taken within 24 hours.  Oh yeah, and you have access to great information on your Insta analytics, including what posts are most engaging, tracking color palette, and even what hashtags have created the best engagement.

VSCO:  If you’re not using this app to filter your photos, you might want to start.  You can save filters to apply to all your pictures to create a pleasing aesthetic for all your Social posts.

Canva: We use Canva to create professional-looking graphics for our posts.  You can even use Canva to create fliers and it’s all super-easy.

Lightroom: If your studio or business has poor lighting or the lighting changes dramatically throughout the day, this app can really help you filter your Social posts.

These are the apps that we’re using every day to systematize our Social posting thus saving us HOURS on Instagram and Facebook.  Hopefully you can use this information to save time and frustration as well!

Follow me on Instagram and see what I’m working on in my business each day @shesonhertoes

I’m super-passionate about leading and managing my hardworking team.  Check out my courses How To Hire A Rockstar Team and 5 Days to Time Freedom to keep developing your leadership skills.

 

Podcast Episode 9: How to Get New Clients to Your Business Every Single Day

What if there was a way to actually spend your advertising budget to bring guaranteed new leads into your business each and every day?  Sound too good to be true.  It’s not.

Paid social advertising is the most effective way that I’ve found to advertise my studios.  But, we aren’t just placing ads.  We’re generating leads.  There’s a difference.  And that’s what we’ll be talking about today on the podcast … How to use ads to generate new leads for your fitness studios every month.

Click here to listen to the She’s On Her Toes Podcast.

She's On Her Toes

And once you have the contact information of these people, you can keep reaching out to them—until they tell you not to.  When you think about paid social ads for your studio, think bigger—you want to generate leads and build your contact list.

And we’re so excited because today on the She’s On Her Toes podcast, we have our first guest, David Philips, founder and CEO of One Marketing.  David is the brains behind all of my studio’s Facebook and Instagram ads.  We talk about our latest ad (you can watch it here) and why it’s working.  Can you believe one of my talented teachers shot the video and edited this?!

As of this post, this amazing testimonial ad has brought in about 40 leads in just 2 short weeks.  It’s literally our most successful ad yet.

During the podcast, my managers, Emily and Christina, share how we reach out to these new leads and get them to sign up for their first class.  We have a whole process, of course!

Since the goal of this website and podcast is to give you actionable information that works, we want to give you more information about how create your own lead generation campaign.  Learn more here.

If you are interested in contacting David directly, check out his website and learn how his advertising platform, StudioEngine, can help you generate leads and get prospective new clients to reach out to your fitness studio.

Check out StudioEngine for yourself. 

Click here to listen to the She’s On Her Toes Podcast.

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Why List Building is Better than Advertising for Your Fitness Business

We all know that advertising is essential to running a successful fitness business.  To keep growing your studio revenues, it’s nothing more than a numbers game—you’ve got to keep getting in more new clients each month and then convert as many as possible to grow.

But isn’t paid social where it’s at?  Why should I worry about building an email list?

1. Email Subscribers Are More Likely to be Buyers

Why?  In our scrolling society, we aren’t too picky about who we follow and what we look at on Facebook and Instagram.  Um … exes, random people you haven’t seen in years, random people you only met once, weird looking dogs and cats, the list goes on.  But … we flip out if someone emails us too much or we get on some spammy list.  Am I right?  Bottom line, if someone signs up for your emails, they want to receive and read them.  They have given you the green light into their inbox and eventually into their wallets.

2. People Check Their Email Every Day

As Facebook and Instagram make regular tweaks to their algorithms, your posts may not reach all your followers.  But … everyone checks their email.  Like every day.  Even if they don’t admit it.  If you’ve got something really important to tell your clients (or future clients) you can bet most of them will at least glance at your email in their inbox before deleting.

3. Social Is a Rented Platform

Since none of us is fortunate enough to own Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, or Google, we just have to settle on using them to build followers.  But even if the mere thought of finance and accounting gives you hives, you know that owning an asset is far better than renting.  When you build a list of email subscribers, you build an audience.  This audience is an asset.  As you offer and develop new products and services, you can sell them to your list over and over again.

So how do you build a list?  You can actually use paid social to build your list … and your business.

On Thursday, be sure to check out an interview with my online marketer, David Philips, Founder and CEO of ONEMarketing.  That’s right!  It’s a video!  David and I will be discussing how to use paid social to generate leads for your business and build your list.  You won’t want to miss this!

 

What’s the Lifetime Value of Your Average Client?

One of the questions I’ve been asking myself over the last three months has been, “How much should I spend on marketing and advertising on a per client basis?”  Essentially, I’m trying to figure out how much is too much so I’m not wasting money and eroding my net income.  Determining this value could also be useful when planning my monthly clothing expense budget.

I just finished a great book called, Buying Customers: Revolutionary new rules for you to get more customers with far less money, by Brad Sugars.  In his book, Sugars discusses the importance of looking at marketing and lead generation as an investment rather than an expense.  Why is that?

Well … when you calculate the Lifetime Value of your average client or customer, you might realize that you can spend more than you thought to attract new clients or “assets” to your business.

This week I took the time to determine the Lifetime Value of my average client as well as my highest spending clients.  Here’s what I discovered:

First, I wanted to look at the value of an average client in 2016.  To calculate this, I took my annual sales divided by the number of active members and came up with $1,675.  Our clients on Pure Barre Platinum (12-month contract) pay $139 x 12 months = $1,668, so I find it valuable to know that an average client would spend about $140 each month on classes and clothing.

Next, I ran a “Big Spenders” report in MindBody, which is the client management software we use at my studios, to determine the value of my top clients in 2016.  My top 100 clients, or the top spending 100 clients, had an average annual value of $2,545.  My top 10 clients, or the 10 clients who spent the most at my studios, had an average annual value of $4,097!  This means my very best clients were spending about $341 each month or 144% more than my average client!

But these are just annual average values and my typical client stays on for about 3 years.  This number was a little tricky to determine, but I did the best I could looking at my top 20 clients and how long they’d been taking class.  Then I did a simple average to come up with the 3 years.

Based on this information, the Lifetime Value of my average client is $5,025 and the Lifetime Value of my top clients is $12,291.  Or is it?  Each client usually refers at least one friend, so the Lifetime Value of each client at my studios is between $10,050 and $24,582!

What does this mean?  Well, if we don’t get a client to purchase a package beyond our $99 Intro Month, we’ve lost not the value of the next package, but potentially $25,000 or more depending on how many friends that client refers.  Yikes!

It also means that I now have a baseline from which to determine my marketing and advertising expenditures to attract new clients.  If the average client has a Lifetime Value of $10,050, then I can probably spend a little more money than what I have been to acquire new clients.  Specifically, I want to host more events at the studios to promote our Pure Barre community and now I know that spending that extra money makes sense, especially if I can attract more people like my top clients.

Cue the G.I. Joe public service announcement!

I’ve received several inquiries over the last few weeks about what makeup and skincare products I use.  I’ll share my skincare routine with you in my next post.

I’ve also made significant progress writing my book on how to run a successful fitness studio—it’s almost done and I’ve started having discussions about publishing.  This means I’ll be able to increase my posts pretty soon.  Good times!

Until then, stay on your toes!

Buying Customers: Revolutionary new rules for you to get more customers with far less money, Brad Sugars

 

Refocus Your Marketing to Refocus Your Business

Marketing.  Admittedly the part of my business that I would rather spend as little time as possible.  The reason being that it seems like I spend money marketing my studios and then I never really know if it’s working.  I know marketing is important to attract new clients, but I never really felt confident about where to spend my marketing budget.  Was my message reaching my ideal client?  Did that person feel compelled to come into the studios to take class?  Who knows?!  I was approaching marketing in the wrong way.

The American Marketing Association has come up with the following definition of marketing.

Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.

Sweet.  I just reread that definition three times and I’m still not sure what it’s supposed to mean.  For small businesses, marketing is the cost of acquiring customers.  And it wasn’t until I embraced this definition of marketing that I actually got good at it.

Maybe you’re a marketing wiz, but for me, thinking of marketing as the cost of acquiring a customer or simply, what makes sense for me to spend to acquire a customer, was mind blowing.  Marketing was always kind of a nuisance and I was never sure how much to spend.  But this actually made sense.

So basically, you need to figure out the lifetime value of your ideal customer—how much revenue will you get from this customer from an initial purchase, over a year, over several years?  Once you have that value as a dollar amount, you’ll be able to determine what makes sense to acquire that customer.  If your customer only makes one purchase, then you’ll likely want to spend a lesser percentage of the revenue they generate to get them to buy.  If your customer is making predictable or reoccurring purchases and there is a high likelihood that you can up-sell them on other products and services that you offer, then maybe you spend more.

If you’ve been struggling with marketing and attracting new clients to your business, then changing your perspective on what marketing is can have a profound impact on your business growth.

But what if you are having trouble changing your perspective?  What if you feel so overwhelmed by running your business that you don’t know where to start to make changes?  In my next post, I’ll tell you what I’m reading and why it’s important for every business owner to start the day by reading (or listening to) uplifting business books.

Until then, stay on your toes!